The Spivey's Simple Life

The Spivey's Simple Life

DIY, gardening, Product reviews, Eco friendly practices, and insight on our everyday life are what we post. We're Just two young people striving to make our every day actions less complicated and better for the earth. Browse the links below. Got a question? Click ask and one of us will get back to you
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Looks like our year of dreads video won’t be coming this week

The rain has killed our video making, but it has been so good for the aquifers and landscape, it’s not much of a bummer.

olivialeann asked: Do yall palm roll yall dreads I separate mine but other then that I let them do what ever any advice would help

No, no palm rolling or other maintenance really. They rounded out on their own except for a few that are still flat. It was our understanding that Palm rolling is a never ending practice and we are too lazy to keep up with that :P

It’s our dreadiversary! Let us tell you how it all began:

Last year, after our wedding, Mrs. Spivey decided not to brush. We didn’t exactly write down the day, but it was between the 3rd and 7th of July that Mr. Spivey tossed the idea of getting 30”+ of hair cut off. This prompted the decision to abandon conditioner and brushing our hair. All to avoid a haircut!

Months before and a few months in, we were using Giovanni tea tree triple treat. That shampoo is pretty void of anything that might cause residue since it’s on the clarifying side so we just used it up. It must have been this shampoo, coupled with our split ends, and tendency to have nape knots at the end of any given day that really helped our dreads take off.

The first month was pretty tough because we didn’t separate like we should have and we both got beaver tails. Mr. Spivey definitely had faster progress at that time. It may be due to the sheer amount of hair literally tripling up on itself and of course the tendency to be dry, but it looked like he had dreads in only a month. Albeit kindof funny looking, they were obviously dreads happening. Mrs. rocked the bed head look for a few months and then, bam… Nape dreads formed and went up from there.

All of our dreads were very flat in the beginning months. On both sets of hair. Even at a year, we both still have a few “flatties”. Those flat nape hairs rounded out pretty fast, they’re visible at the 3 month mark on the Mrs.! She was kindof disappointed that they were so round and completely blunted ends, but they naturally did that on their own and it’s pretty fascinating that your hair can change that fast, naturally. The ends on Caucasian dreads tend to stay unknotted, and that’s exactly what the Mr.’s did. They are still here today, and might never be sucked into the dreads. “What will be, will be”.

That’s the beautiful part about the neglect/freeform/natural method of waiting for your hair to knot. It changes all the time and it’s as unique as you are, it teaches patience and acceptance. It also can teach you to question traditional beauty norms and of course “body maintenance”. It’s probably the only hairstyle that can teach you something. If you’re thinking about not brushing, give it a go. It can only reward you internally and externally.

Love and light,
Simple Spiveys

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